5 Colors, 5 Flavors, 5 Ways by Elizabeth Andoh Oct12

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5 Colors, 5 Flavors, 5 Ways by Elizabeth Andoh

 

goshiki  五色 

5 Colors 

 

 

 



When you choose a colorful range of foods, nutrients "naturally" come into balance without doing complicated dietary calculations. Although the specific nutritional profile of foods in the same color category are different  — carbohydrate and fiber-packed corn and vitamin C-rich lemons are both yellow; low-sodium, calcium-rich black sesame seeds and low-cholesterol, Vitamin E-rich nori are both black –  by including some food from each of the five colors you are sure to achieve variety. And when combined with the other considerations of including various flavors and cooking preparation methods, balance — and harmony — is the result.

 

 

 



 

Umeboshi
Maguro Tuna

RED 赤 aka 

The category RED contains fruits, vegetables, meat and some dried beans. The palette ranges from orange & russet tones to pink & magenta, and includes crimson & ruby hues, too.  Although artificial red food dye does not contribute to the nutritional profile of a food, tinting foods such as umeboshipink with the natural food dye processed from dried red shiso (called aka-jiso or yukari, in Japanese) will qualify a food for inclusion in this category.

 

 

 

 


 

Okome Rice
Tofu
 

WHITE 白 shiro 

The color category white includes rice, and many other grains, cereals, and seeds in addition to several vegetables and tubers. The white category, also includes tofu and soy milk. Mild-flavored, delicate white-fleshed fish (shiromi-zakana, in Japanese) and “white meat” chicken and pork can also be counted in this group.

 

 

 

 



 

Mackerel Fish
 
 

GREEN 青 ao 

The word ao in Japanese means both “green” and "blue." This category includes many legumes, leafy vegetables and herbs (aquatic and terrestrial) in addition to oily fishes such as mackerel and sardines, called ao-zakana (literally “blue” fish).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 
Kabocha

YELLOW 黄 ki

This category includes fruits and vegetables, eggs, and some grains and nuts. Although artificial yellow food dye does not contribute to the nutritional profile of a food, tinting foods yellow with the natural food dye processed from dried gardenia pods (called kuchinashi no mi in Japanese) will qualify a food for inclusion in this category.

 

 

 

 


 
Fresh Shitake Mushroom
 
Black Sesame Seed
 

BLACK 黒 kuro
 

Very dark foods such as nori laver, eggplant skins, shiitakemushrooms, black soy beans, and black sesame seeds comprise the color category of black.

 

 

A TASTE OF CULTURE culinary arts program combines spicy tidbits of food lore with practical tips and skill-building lessons on how to prepare Japanese food. Programs are conducted in Tokyo, Japan, and offer a unique opportunity for foreign residents and visitors from overseas to explore and enjoy Japan's culture through its food. Instruction, by Elizabeth Andoh, is in English.

 

 

 

Born, raised and educated in America, Elizabeth Andoh has made Japan her home for more than four decades. A graduate of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor), Andoh’s formal culinary training was taken at the Yanagihara School of Classical Japanese Cuisine (Tokyo).

Andoh is the author of six books on Japanese cooking, including two IACP award-winners, An Ocean of Flavor (Morrow, 1988) and Washoku (Ten Speed, 2005). She was Gourmet's Japan correspondent for more than three decades and was a regular contributor to the New York Times travel section for many years. Andoh lectures internationally on Japanese food and culture and directs A Taste of Culture, a culinary program based in Tokyo, Japan.

Elizabeth Andoh’s website, http://www.tasteofculture.com/