Japanese Version
Koho Tatsumura: Nishiki Weaving for the 21st Century
Aug09

Koho Tatsumura: Nishiki Weaving for the 21st Century

“Behind Paper Doors–a series about remarkable people in Kyoto.” © Photos by Helen Hasenfeld Overview Japanese weaving is so intricate, and thus so stunningly beautiful that experts worldwide have come to both describe it and distinguish it from ordinary brocade simply by using its Japanese name, Nishiki (pronounced knee-she-key).  Compared with the simple, plain weaving of European tapestries, Nishiki is...

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Toko Shinoda Painter and Printmaker Extraordinaire

Distinction, an original painting. Steve here: I have asked longtime Tokyo resident and modern Japanese print and painting expert, Norman Tolman, to share with us about one of his favorite artists. Norm Tolman: Toko Shinoda continues to confound the critics with her work as she has from its very beginning.  Is it traditional?  Well the materials are – hand-made washi and mashi paper, silver, gold, and platinum leaf, old sumi ink...

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Horiki Eriko: Pioneer on the Washi Frontier

Traditional handmade washi paper can be found everywhere in Japan, from name cards to beautiful wrapping paper.  But washi as large format installation art, using paper tapestries up to 50 feet long, brings this ancient process to a new artistic level altogether. Situated in a simple, modern concrete building in a narrow old Kyoto neighborhood is the studio and showroom of one of Japan’s most successful contemporary artists, Horiki...

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Fukami Sueharu: After 20 years, an overnight success

I first saw the work of Fukami Sueharu-san while walking down Gojozaka in Kyoto, nearly 10 years ago. My colleague, Nancy Craft, and I spotted his work in a gallery window. Our jaws dropped to the ground. Neither of us had ever seen such striking work. That afternoon, Nancy and I visited indigo-artist Fukumoto Shihoko-san’s studio.  Again, our jaws dropped to the ground.  Coincidentally, for the second time that day and the second...

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Noguchi and Izumi-Stone House in Shikoku
Mar24

Noguchi and Izumi-Stone House in Shikoku

Today, I entered a house of stone.  Honey warm in the afternoon light.  A private home on Shikoku Island in southern Japan.  Built by Isamu Noguchi and Masatoshi Izumi in 1972.  Based partially on impressions of houses in Ahmenabad, India.     FotoViewr – Create your 3D photo gallery The lead photo in the above slide show is by Gail Rieke. A tropical space, open to the outdoors and to Noguchi's stone sculptures in the...

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