Japanese Version
Koho Tatsumura: Nishiki Weaving for the 21st Century
Aug09

Koho Tatsumura: Nishiki Weaving for the 21st Century

“Behind Paper Doors–a series about remarkable people in Kyoto.” © Photos by Helen Hasenfeld Overview Japanese weaving is so intricate, and thus so stunningly beautiful that experts worldwide have come to both describe it and distinguish it from ordinary brocade simply by using its Japanese name, Nishiki (pronounced knee-she-key).  Compared with the simple, plain weaving of European tapestries, Nishiki is...

Read More
Nuno
Aug03

Nuno

May, 2015 In Layering Sukesuke is all in how things show through. NUNO inserts small, light objects between layers of sheer silk organdy to accentuate the translucency. This is much more laborious than it sounds: computer-driven looms must be stopped over and over again, row after row, so that feathers can be hand-positioned. Alternatively, organdy is shot through with in-layered strips of Mino washi handmade paper or plastic...

Read More

I ONLY HAVE EYES FOR BLUE (AND WHITE)

  I ONLY HAVE EYES FOR BLUE (AND WHITE) By Amy Katoh     Far too soon to be posting again, but I must share the glorious indigo that has been pouring into my life this week. Today is Boys’ Day, the 5th day of the 5th month when families celebrate their sons. Colorful carp banners fly in all the skies of Japan, signifying      courage and bravery. The sight of lines of brilliant carp banners strung over rooftops and even rivers gives...

Read More

Nuno Designing Textiles for the 21st Century

In 1984, Reiko Sudo co-founded Nuno Corporation with Junichi Arai, specializing in the design, production and sale of functional, innovative fabrics. She is Nuno’s director and principal designer. Nuno’s works are in numerous permanent museum collections throughout the world, including a couple of dozen at New York’s MOMA. Inspired by the look of rubber bands on a magazine in a sunny window, Nuno devised a process using resin dyed to...

Read More

Gungendo – Pioneers in the Slow Clothes Movement

The Matsubas are to clothes what Alice Waters is to the Slow Food movement. Their 30-year old company, Gungendo, is dedicated to the principle of Slow Clothes, reflected in their strong commitment to supporting sustainable rural communities and retaining important textile-related skills in Japan. Their designs are not about fashion fads, but about timeless personal style, high quality and comfort. Tomi Matsuba, co-owner of Gungendo...

Read More

Yuzen Shirts by Hiroshi Saito

Whenever I wear a Hiroshi Saito Shirt in Japan or North America, I am always asked about it. These one-of-a-kind, art-to-wear shirts are hand dyed with Japanese traditional brushes. Saito-san's free hand spontaneous brush strokes show up well on the wonderfully high-quality cotton. He then collaborates with the seamstress, specifying what colors go to the collar, front and pocket. The result, as you can see, is rich in color and...

Read More